Were Windows 10’s tiles a good idea?

Tiles were implemented on Windows with the very forgettable 8!

The worst thing is that the usual location of the start button did not fulfill its role anymore, even though it was always there!

The change was such that many users were more than chilled.

At work I strongly recommended not to put a PC under 8 and to wait for the next version, 8 was a pushover like Vista.

I am used to testing various graphical interfaces under Linux for fun (mine is my favorite but in live CD I try to know!) but I was still dismayed by the interface of 8.
I could not find how to turn off the PC I was presented nor how to get out of it having the command prompt ( CMD) without looking from another PC how to do on a tutorial!!!

In short…

But why was such a horror tested by Microsoft?

Because it corresponded to a project to unify computer environments and the idea was that tablets would take over and the end of the desktop PC.

So a single PC, tablet, phone environment would have been a good idea since the tiles are close to the way of doing things on a smartphone.

There was also the launch of touch screens which would have made this coherence even more valid.

But unfortunately, touch screens didn’t work (too expensive, fragile) and windows phones disappeared.

The public has massively rejected 8 and 10 has found a more classic environment with a touch of tiles that some people like (it’s a quick access to what we use the most, if we configure it correctly).

I don’t mind the tiles in 10, since it’s not opposed to the way I use a PC.

So the tiles of 10 are not a problem.

On how many computers can you install Windows 10 with one key?

In order to use Windows legally, it is necessary to activate it with a license. The license is the famous serial number that we must enter during the installation or activation process to unlock all the functions of the operating system. Depending on the edition of the license (Home or Pro) it has a more or less expensive price. And also, depending on the type of it (OEM or Retail), it will be more or less expensive. But what if we have two computers? Will we have to buy two licenses or will it only work with one?

The first thing to remember is the difference between the two types of license. On the one hand, we have OEM License, cheaper than usual only sold to manufacturers. This is the one that comes by default when we buy a PC and is valid only for that PC. The Retail License is more expensive, and it is the one that any user can buy. It is not tied to any hardware, and if we change computers, we can activate it at other times.

If we are one of those who buy computers already assembled, we will have no problem, because most of them come with factory licenses (OEM). However, if we have one, two or more computers assembled by ourselves or by a store, things change. These computers usually do not have a Windows license. And that’s where the questions start.

If I have a Windows 10 key, can I use it on two or more computers?

Windows OEM licenses are only valid for specific hardware. This is related to the motherboard, and although this allows us to change some components (such as hard drive, memory and even graphics, if you can), at the time the board or CPU is changed, the license ceases to be valid. Hopefully, if we change only the CPU, we can recover it via Microsoft SAM. But if the board dies, the key dies with it.

This means that if we have an OEM license and we have activated it on one computer, it cannot be activated on another computer. However, we could take advantage of the license if we bought an identical motherboard to the one we had. But it has to be identical, even while being tested. Otherwise, it will be invalid.

Obviously, each key is unique. And therefore, we cannot activate it in any other way on other computers.

Will we be forced to switch to Windows version 11?

Probably not, no one was forced to switch to Windows 10 (even if Microsoft didn’t mind presenting confusing dialog boxes at the time that made some people start migrating without realizing that this was what they were accepting).

There is a chance that the migration will be free for a while, and it is already known that Windows 10 will be obsolete within five years (so it will not be secure anymore). It’s quite possible that waiting for the end of Windows 10 support is the best way to have to choose between a paid upgrade and a system that will leave the field open to hackers.

On the other hand, maybe you’ll have to change your computer before that date, and then you’ll have no choice: once Windows 11 is out, that’s what you’ll find on all commercial computers.

Finally, there’s a good chance you won’t be able to migrate to Windows 11 anyway. The hardware requirements have been increased a lot and if your machines are more than two or three years old, it’s very likely that they won’t be compatible (which is a totally political decision from MS, as Windows 11 is not much more than a marketing move. Under the hood and the refreshed interface, it’s still Windows 10).

Why should I upgrade to Windows 11?

I may have missed something, but it didn’t seem to me that I should.

What I understood from the news, from the information … is that we are suggested, for the moment, to get ready to change version, and in some time we will be told that it is necessary to do it not to be annoyed.

This is not a new phenomenon, and its purpose is to allow the operating system publisher to better manage the user base.

The fact remains that the new version is only just emerging, and with Microsoft it is urgent not to rush into things too quickly to avoid the worst disappointments. A new version, even if it seems to be more cosmetic than technically useful, will probably have a few little things in it that won’t surprise everyone at first, but that will eventually show that it’s time to stop having blind faith in all the commercial products that manufacturers try to push on us.

So, for my part, I’m going to do with Windows 11 as I did with the previous ones, test the new version in virtual machines without taking any risks, and in a while, one or two years, I might switch the base operating system of my physical machines. But for now, let’s let three or five hundred million testers give us feedback.

compared to what I’ve read, the security aspect is optimal, but the biggest flaw reported is a 30% drop in graphics card performance … due to the anti-cryptofarming protection system (which can be removed but it’s not really recommended) … well, for at least 60% of computer users, it’s not even felt. On the other hand, for those who work on 3D software, who do video post production, not to mention gamers, it’s catastrophic! 30% less performance! we go back almost 20 years with encoding times of more than 20 hours for video!!! impossible lags in 3D graphic design and a FPS worthy of the last century for gamers. moreover, you need a computer with ultra recent functionalities otherwise you can’t even install it… but the computer’s security is almost inviolable (according to crosoft of course, let’s be honest, it’s just that hackers haven’t put their noses on it yet). so for the moment, you might as well stay on 10 if your computer isn’t a top of the line ultra recent model.

That’s because to do that you’re going to have to change the hardware, which will be good for the industry. Otherwise it seems that the main goal is to use the security provided by the hardware. After that, we can imagine that one day they will abandon the 10 and that at that time the update will be paid. Personally I don’t have a compatible computer and I don’t want to change it for this reason.

Not absolutely necessary! At least until 2025, when Windows 10 support was supposed to end. I would say, if your W10 works well, why change.

Now to answer your question, it’s always good to keep your computer up to date, with the latest software or system versions. But in this case we can wait. Let’s wait for the first feedback, the first fixes for security flaws etc.

Why does Windows 10 block the installation of Qbittorent?

Windows 10 is not slow in general. Do you mean slow compared to other OS, slow compared to previous versions, are you talking about your personal case or a generalization?

First things first: the processes that consume cpu/memory (especially antivirus), the swap and swap files, the state of your hard drive, and the famous temporary files cleaning.

Generally speaking, use an SSD for the system disk, and if necessary a non SSD capacitive disk for the rest.

I migrated from Windows 10 to 11 on two of the PCs in our house, my sons not being “hot” to try the experience on their “gamer” PCs before having the feedback from their parents’ computers!

In both cases, I had noted the RAM and the % of processor before migration. Verdict: PCs running Win11 use significantly less RAM than did 10 (3.2 GB vs 4 GB). And they seem to boot even faster.

Now, both computers had been running Windows 10 for several years, with x successive patches applied which is never as “clean” as a fresh install. To have a really reliable comparison, you would have to reinstall Windows 10, measure the RAM used and then switch to 11.

No, because booting a system is done on a disk/partition specific to the system.

Unless there is a problem with a partition blocked by one of the two OS (usually a third partition data if it exists) the only time lost is the time given to GRUB, which allows to switch from one OS to another at boot time.

Yes of course, we don’t have much choice anymore!

Indeed, Microsoft has committed to support Windows 7 for 10 years, when it was released on October 22, 2009. And this duration is coming to an end in a few months. After January 14, 2020, if your PC is running Windows 7, it will no longer receive security updates[1] .

Therefore, it is important that you upgrade to a modern operating system such as Windows 10, which can benefit from the latest security updates. For this, you have three options:

1 => Purchase a new PC.

2 => Migrate to Windows 10 (The ultimate guide to upgrading from Windows 7 to Windows 10).

3 => Install windows 10 on your current computer. You can find the process here Kapo El’s answer to How to install Windows 10?

If you continue to use Windows 7 after the end of support, your PC will continue to work, but it will become more vulnerable to security risks and viruses. Your PC will continue to boot and run, but you will no longer receive software updates, including security updates, from Microsoft.

Don’t forget my vote, if you think I deserve it.

Windows 10 is optimized for SSDs.

So with hard drives some people have slowdowns or 100% hard drive activity rates while nothing is happening.

The solution is to put the System on an SSD and have for storage a hard drive.

All this in addition to the excellent answers already said!

Probably not, no one was forced to switch to Windows 10 (even if Microsoft didn’t mind presenting confusing dialog boxes at the time that made some people start migrating without realizing that this was what they were accepting).

There is a chance that the migration will be free for a while, and it is already known that Windows 10 will be obsolete within five years (so it will not be secure anymore). It’s quite possible that waiting for the end of Windows 10 support is the best way to have to choose between a paid upgrade and a system that will leave the field open to hackers.

On the other hand, maybe you’ll have to change your computer before that date, and then you’ll have no choice: once Windows 11 is out, that’s what you’ll find on all commercial computers.

Finally, there’s a good chance you won’t be able to migrate to Windows 11 anyway. The hardware requirements have been increased a lot and if your machines are more than two or three years old, it’s very likely that they won’t be compatible (which is a totally political decision from MS, as Windows 11 is not much more than a marketing move. Under the hood and the refreshed interface, it’s still Windows 10).

The installation process of windows 7 is quite simple. However, I advise you to read this other answer[1] before you start.

If you decide, the main steps of the process are the following:

  1. As materials, you will need a USB key
  2. The image file of windows 7, which is totally free.
  3. Now you need to create a windows 7 installation USB key.
  4. After that, you will only have to install Windows itself

At the end of your installation, think about the essentials for a freshly installed system. You can find here[2] the first things to do when you have a new PC.

If we talk about Windows 10 among Windows, Windows 10 is, all in all, more stable than Windows 8/8.1. Just like Windows 3.1 was more stable than Windows 2 or 3.0. From what I see of Windows, both at home and in the office, flexibility deteriorates with new versions. We are changing the operating model for Windows to a service model.

Now, if we want to go beyond Windows and consider MacOS and Linux, I would clearly say that Linux and MacOS are more stable and reliable. Linux offers a wider range of options than MacOS, which is controlled by Apple.